Sunday, December 10, 2017

Have a look …

 About Last Night | A little taste.

If it comes to Philly, I’ll go see it. Terry’s Satchmo at the Waldorf was great.

Just in time …

 Paul Davis On Crime: 'A Christmas Carol' Saved Dickens From Crushing Debt.

Happy birthday …

 Informal Inquiries : Emily Dickinson born on 10 December 1830.

Round and round he goes …

… One Long Circular Argument. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

… natural selection, whether among organisms or among “memes,” is sensitive to survival value alone. It “cares” nothing about the truth or falsity of our thoughts or the logical rigor of our arguments. If comforting falsehoods and fallacious reasoning happen to be conducive to our survival, then they will be selected for. They will seem right to us even if they are not. But then, if Dennett’s account of the origin of human thought processes were correct, we could have no reason to suppose that those processes track truth or conform to canons of logical inference. Again, they will appear to do so even if they do not. This undermines any confidence we could have in any idea or argument—including Dennett’s.
Given his views, it's a wonder why Dennett even bothers to think let alone share his thoughts with the rest of us. Oh, well, it's all illusory anyway, right?

Preferences and predilections …

Gained in Translation. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)
Translating literature is not always more difficult than translating other texts—tourist brochures, technical manuals, art catalogues, sales contracts, and the like. But it does have this distinguishing characteristic: its sense is not limited to a simple function of informing or persuading, but rather thrives on a superabundance of possible meanings, an openness to interpretation, an invitation to measure what is described against our experience. This is stimulating. The more we bring to it, the more it offers, with the result that later readings will be different from the first in a way that is hardly true of a product description or city guide.  

Much indeed in what he says …

… The U.S. Media Yesterday Suffered its Most Humiliating Debacle in Ages: Now Refuses All Transparency Over What Happened.

So continually awful and misleading has this reporting been that even Vladimir Putin’s most devoted critics – such as Russian expatriate Masha Gessenoppositional Russian journalists, and anti-Kremlin liberal activists in Moscow – are constantly warning that the U.S. media’s unhinged, ignorant, paranoid reporting on Russia is harming their cause in all sorts of ways, in the process destroying the credibility of the U.S. media in the eyes of Putin’s opposition (who — unlike Americans who have been fed a steady news and entertainment propaganda diet for decades about Russia — actually understand the realities of that country).
I'm so old I remember when progressives thought the world of Russia.

Inquirer reviews …

John Banville channels Henry James' 'Portrait' in beguiling 'Mrs. Osmond'.

'Bible Nation': How the Green family cornered the evangelical market.

Something to think on …

It is not in the nature of politics that the best men should be elected. The best men do not want to govern their fellowmen.
— George MacDonald, born on this date in 1824

Saturday, December 09, 2017

Christmas fundamentalists...

In case you wondered …

… Why the Humanities Must Remain Human (Or Die) | Joshua Mayo | First Things.

History, English, and language departments lurch and lumber on, but the final tire-iron to the head might be student enrollment. Data from the Education Department's Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System tells us now that fewer than 12 percent of students earning bachelor’s degrees are graduating from humanities programs. That’s a 20-percent drop over the last ten years. Of course, the decline owes something to market forces. But is it too speculative to wonder whether a defect in the humanities’ product might factor in? When diverse theoretical agendas replace the fundamental arts of truth-seeking—the glittering cosmos of great books and great ideas—it is no surprise that students want to blow this popsicle stand. “Four years of Foucault, Cixous, and Žižek? Thanks, but no thanks. I’ll shop elsewhere.”

Of blogs and blogging …

… Informal Inquiries : A small-minded Luddite resists some technology: a few thoughts about tweets, likes, and a bit more.

Judge for yourself …

… Is the Sea Level Stable at Aden, Yemen? | SpringerLink.

FYI …

… Scientifically Illiterate America | Hoover Institution.

Non-scientists are likely to be fooled or manipulated … because scientific illiteracy runs deep. A 2001 study sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation found that only about half of all people surveyed understood that the earth circles the sun once a year, while only 45 percent could give an “acceptable definition” of DNA and only 22 percent understood what a molecule was. More recent research by Jon Miller, Professor of Integrative Studies at Michigan State University, found that 70 percent of Americans cannot understand the science section of the New York Times.

Wondrous …

'Twas ever thus …

… What C.S. Lewis Can Teach Us About America's Pronoun Wars.

“Until quite modern times all teachers and even all men believed the universe to be such that certain emotional reactions on our part could be either congruous or incongruous to it — believed, in fact, that objects did not merely receive, but could merit, our approval or disapproval, our reverence or our contempt,” Lewis wrote.

Bad guys …

… Paul Davis On Crime: My Piece On Operation Regional Shield And The Transnational Criminal Gang MS-13.

Looking back …

… Kazuo Ishiguro - Nobel Lecture: My Twentieth Century Evening – and Other Small Breakthroughs. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

When I look back to this period, and remember it was less than twenty years from the end of a world war in which the Japanese had been their bitter enemies, I'm amazed by the openness and instinctive generosity with which our family was accepted by this ordinary English community. The affection, respect and curiosity I retain to this day for that generation of Britons who came through the Second World War, and built a remarkable new welfare state in its aftermath, derive significantly from my personal experiences from those years.

Art and nature …

… Zealotry of Guerin: Fog Day Painting (Julia Guerin), Sonnet #382.

Something to think on …

Why not be oneself? That is the whole secret of a successful appearance. If one is a greyhound why try to look like a Pekinese?
— Edith Sitwell, who died on this date 1964

Friday, December 08, 2017

Comprehensive chat

… Paul Davis On Crime: My Q&A With Mark Bowden, Author Of 'Hue 1968' And 'Black Hawk Down'.

Born there, like Mr. Bloom …

 A Half-National Treasure. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

From TV's dark age …

… About Last Night | Replay: William Inge’s Picnic, performed by the original cast.

Closet classicist …

… The Metamorphosis | How Bob Dylan was influenced by Homer and Ovid. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Ancient Rome has always mattered to Bob Dylan, from his teenage years when he saw films such as The RobeDemetrius and the Gladiators, and Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s Julius Caesar starring Marlon Brando as Mark Antony. Dylan went for free to the cinema owned by his uncle: there wasn’t much else to do in the deep winters of Hibbing up on the iron range in the far north country of Minnesota. The fifteen-year-old Dylan, then Robert (or Bobby) Zimmerman, studied Latin and joined the Latin Club in his sophomore year. 

In medias res …

… The only way up is down: Rachel Jacoff and Robert Harrison discuss Dante’s Inferno | The Book Haven.

Very often at his best …

… Galway Kinnell's poetry transformed the world, but the world has changed - LA Times. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Nonetheless, it is hard, with all that is happening in the world and especially in America this past year, to say that this is the top book of poetry I’d recommend reading right now. Contemporary readers, especially younger ones, may have a hard time swallowing optimistic secular spiritualisms like the notion that “everything flowers, from within, of self-blessing.” Perhaps not enough room is left in these poems for another kind of wisdom: the ambiguity and uncertainty that newer poetry has become very adept at conveying.
Well, better optimistic secular spiritualisms than pessimistic political religions.

Hmm …

… “Autumn” | The New Yorker. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

I'm not sure we want to learn from children whatever it was Freud is thought to have learned from them.

More bests …

… Hanukkah Gifts: 12 Books To Give Everyone – The Forward.



The Ten Best Science Books of 2017.



… The Ten Best Travel Books of 2017.



(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

No word limit a mixed blessing …

… ‘She Lived to Read’ | Commonweal Magazine. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Definitely worth pondering …

… Informal Inquiries : James Thurber and a dog on the scent of a fearsome trail.

Seeing a world difficult to love …

… Making the Place Beautiful. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Something to think on …

I never had a dog that showed a human fear of death. Death, to a dog, is the final unavoidable compulsion, the least ineluctable scent on a fearsome trail, but they like to face it alone, going out into the woods, among the leaves, if there are any leaves when their time comes, enduring without sentimental human distraction the Last Loneliness, which they are wise enough to know cannot be shared by anyone.
— James Thurber, born on this date in 1894 

Thursday, December 07, 2017

Complements …

 Informal Inquiries : Book Reviews and Literary Criticism.

Real music …

I spent part of this afternoon with Harold. He likes short stories. So I brought him The Best of Richard Matheson, which Penguin has just brought out. Those of us who watched Twilight Zone will recognize the author's name. I like to remind myself that, while this piece was being written, I was a junior in high school. It is characteristic in its combination of unblinking introspection and genuinely heart-felt lyricism. 

In search of …

… The Transition | belz. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Distinctive sensibility …

… James Salter's posthumous collection: masterful writing, unabashedly masculine - Chicago Tribune. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

For the season …

… Paul Davis On Crime: My Crime Fiction: "A Christmas Crime Story".

RIP …

Acclaimed author William H. Gass of University City dies at 93 | Books | stltoday.com. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

The wild and the shocking …

… Philip Hensher - Twentieth-Century Elizabethan | Literary Review | Issue 460. (Ht tip, Dave Lull, )

In case you wondered …

… Best Fiction of 2017.

… Best Nonfiction of 2017.

(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Some poems …

… Carcinogenic Poetry: G. Emil Reutter - Two Poems.



… and another: On The Rubble by G. Emil Reutter.

Hmm …

 Informal Inquiries : "Young Goodman Brown" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.



It's been a long time, but it seems to me that Goodman Brown is the type who weighs everyone in the balance but himself. His is a faith without love.

Something to think on …

The miracles of the church seem to me to rest not so much upon faces or voices or healing power coming suddenly near to us from afar off, but upon our perceptions being made finer, so that for a moment our eyes can see and our ears can hear what is there about us always.
— Willa Cather, born on this date in 1873

Wednesday, December 06, 2017

Fear no more...

Bewildering spectacle …

… D J Taylor - Author of Himself | Literary Review | Issue 460. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In the essay on Waugh that he never lived to complete, Orwell marks this passage down as ‘an irrelevant outburst’, while noting its absolute centrality to the view Waugh held of the world. The hidebound fogeydom into which he lapsed is lavishly on display in A Little Learning. Waugh’s lapidary style and antiquated literary manners here would have made the work seem old-fashioned half a century before. The same air pervades the many interviews that John Howard Wilson and Barbara Cooke print as addenda. Although these include the famous Face to Faceinterrogation by John Freeman, perhaps the most revealing is a Frankly Speaking radio feature from 1953, in which serial teasing alternates with patently serious statements about ‘the man in the street’, the welfare state and Waugh’s Catholic faith. The most deeply felt response comes in the final exchange: ‘Mr Waugh, how, when you die, would you like to be remembered?’ ‘I should like people of their charity to pray for my soul as a sinner.’
Methinks I shall do as he asked.

Listen in …

… Episode 247 – Vanda Krefft – The Virtual Memories Show.

“The most interesting question about Fox is, ‘What do you do when you realize you’re not going to be the person that you want to be?'”

We need more such …

… Richard Wilbur’s heresy: “elegance, wit, and declaration of faith in the cosmic order” | The Book Haven.

Worrisome tale …

… About Last Night | The Levine cataclysm.

It is impossible to overstate the significance of these developments. In a very real sense, James Levine is the Met. He is the public figure most closely associated with the company, the one who has been central to its fortunes for more than four decades, and the first truly great artist to be swept up in the current maelstrom of sexual-harassment accusations. If it is proved that he did what his accusers claim, there can be no doubt that his extraordinary career will come at once to a shameful end.

Physicians and the Bard …

… The Shakespeareologists | City Journal. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

In addition to relaying in his plays many of the superstitions of his time, Shakespeare (who, as far as we know, had no medical training, though like everyone else in those times of heightened mortality, he must have had a lot of experience of disease) made many shrewd and accurate medical observations. One has only to compare them with the observations in Cures Both Empiricall and Historicall Performed upon Very Eminent Persons in Desperate Diseases, the book by his son-in-law, the university-trained physician John Hall, to realize that the medical education of the day was not necessarily an advantage in the art of seeing what was before one’s eyes. Hall’s book was a farrago of nonsense, as well as of disgusting medicaments, and whatever Hall had learned at university bore little relation to any reality external to the medical theorizing through which he then saw his patients. Unlike Hall, Shakespeare (as Dryden put it) “wanted not the spectacles of books to read Nature.” In other words, some kinds of education can be an obstacle to understanding: not, perhaps, an unfamiliar phenomenon even today.

Latter-day research …

… From letters to emails: Reading Ian McEwan’s correspondence. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Emails share much more with previous forms of communication than we usually imagine. Email-writing was initially modelled on letter-writing after all; business memos were another source of inspiration, as the subject line reminds us. Publishers’ archives are full of letters that mix private and professional matters. Even the speed of emails is not a radical innovation, as letters were delivered several times a day in the early twentieth century.

Hall of Famer …

California Hall Of Fame: Gary Snyder’s Poetry To 'Loosen Up The Heart And Mind' - capradio.org.

Gary Snyder Explains His Poem 'For All'.

(Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Some 40-odd years ago I heard Gary Snyder read at Temple University.

In memory of orchards …

… Poem of the week – Walter Osborne: Apple Gathering, Quimperlé by Frank Ormsby | Books | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Simplicity of life, simplicity of diction …

… On Making Oneself Less Unreadable. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

… it really doesn’t matter whether we agree with him or not. Everywhere, even when he is showy—because despite his intolerance for any form of affectation, his could be a rather ostentatious austerity—Fowler’s true love for language is always above his love for himself.
Dave also sends along this: If I Had a Sense of Beauty.


Something to think on …

The person who knows only one religion does not know any religion.
— Max Müller, born on this date in 1823

Tuesday, December 05, 2017

Chance and choice …

… Informal Inquiries : Pascal’s Wager.

RIP …

 Christine Keeler, former model at heart of Profumo affair, dies at 75 | UK news | The Guardian.

RIP …

 Christine Keeler, former model at heart of Profumo affair, dies at 75 | UK news | The Guardian.

Blogging note …

Won't be much blogging today on my part until much later. I have much to do that will take me from desk for most of the day. Maybe this evening.

For your listening pleasure …

… Paul Davis On Crime: Bob Hope Sings The Original 'Silver Bells' In 'The Lemon Drop Kid'.

Something to think on …

The positivists have a simple solution: the world must be divided into that which we can say clearly and the rest, which we had better pass over in silence. But can anyone conceive of a more pointless philosophy, seeing that what we can say clearly amounts to next to nothing? If we omitted all that is unclear, we would probably be left completely uninteresting and trivial tautologies.
— Werner Heisenberg, born on this date in 1901

Monday, December 04, 2017

On the town …

… Opossum breaks into liquor store, gets drunk on bourbon - NY Daily News.

Hmm …

… Informal Inquiries : Jesus’ secret teachings to his “brother” James.



Methinks the headline of the piece linked to promises more than the article delivers

Failures to reproduce studies...statisticians say it's not their fault

To use statistics well, researchers must study how scientists analyse and interpret data and then apply that information to prevent cognitive mistakes. In the past couple of decades, many fields have shifted from data sets with a dozen measurements to data sets with millions. Methods that were developed for a world with sparse and hard-to-collect information have been jury-rigged to handle bigger, more-diverse and more-complex data sets. No wonder the literature is now full of papers that use outdated statistics, misapply statistical tests and misinterpret results. 

Hmm …

… Science vs. Religion: Travels in the Great American Divide | Literary Hub. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



Pete and his family are practicing Mennonites, a Christian denomination that runs from highly conservative—Old Order Mennonites share many practices with the Amish—to more modern. Traditionally, the more conservative Mennonites reject climate change, but Pete is part of a nascent Mennonite progressive movement embracing conservation and sustainability.
Maybe the conversation could proceed better if we all started by getting our terms straight. Take this phrase: "… the more conservative Mennonites reject climate change." Do they really deny that climate changes? Do they really believe that it is static? Does anyone? The current debate seems to center on the direction climate change is taking. But the debate gets muddied by references to Earth's climate. Earth, of course, has several climates. You will recall those terms arctic, tropical, and temperate. I feel pretty certain that human activity is a factor to be considered, and serves to explain why the Holocene epoch we are living in has lasted longer than other, similar epochs that punctuated the 2 million years of the Pleistocene. But I suspect that geologic and astronomical factors (the Sun, the Sun!) will prove more decisive in the long run. 
As for the science vs. religion debate, I think there is much to be said for Stephen Jay Gould's notion of non-overlapping magisteria. But then I think that poetry is a way of knowing every bit as valid as science — and wider ranging, too.

Erotic Emily …

 Informal Inquiries : "A Bee his burnished Carriage" by Emily Dickinson.

Something to think on …

Let life happen to you. Believe me: life is in the right, always.
— Rainer Maria Rilke, born on this date in 1875

In case you wondered...

Sunday, December 03, 2017

All aglow …


Wynn the Service Dog kisses a reindeer and gets lit up himself.

For your listening pleasure …

 Paul Davis On Crime: A Little Night Music: Four For Christmas - Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole And Vince Guaraldi's Christmas Albums.

Good question …

… Who can fill the role of Tom Lehrer today? (Hat tip, Dave lull.)

The subject is mortality …

… Jorie Graham: ‘I am living in the late season, but it has its songs, too’ | Books | The Guardian. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Slip of the tongue …

… Jennifer Reeser Poem | National Review. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Methods …

… The Poet's Pencil | by Charles Simic | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Since poets, if they are honest, rarely know where their poems come from or remember how exactly they were put together, they are forced to concoct explanations out of their biography, literary jargon, and psychobabble in the air to please their audiences. They didn’t always have to do that. Nobody asked T.S. Eliot or Robert Frost such questions. I recall a famous poet in my youth, sitting in a chair surrounded by kneeling students who watched him in total absorption as he cleaned his nails with a toothpick, thoroughly and in complete silence.

Inquirer reviews …

… New Alexander Calder book puts Philly-linked sculptor among the 20th-century greats.

… Our reviewers sniff out the best books to give this holiday season.

For the season …

Today really is the first day of Advent.


Advent


The leaves are fallen, but the sky is clear
(Though winter’s scheduling an arctic flight).
The rumor is a rendezvous draws near.

Some say a telling sign will soon appear,
Though evidence this may be so is slight:
The leaves are fallen, but the sky is clear.

Pale skeptics may be perfectly sincere
To postulate no ground for hope, despite
The rumor that a rendezvous draws near.

More enterprising souls may shed a tear
And, looking up, behold a striking light:
The leaves are fallen, but the sky is clear.

The king, his courtiers, and priests, all fear
Arrival of a challenge to their might:
The rumor is a rendezvous draws near.

The wise in search of something all can cheer
May not rely on ordinary sight:
The leaves are fallen, but the sky is clear.

Within a common place may rest one dear
To all who yearn to see the world made right.
The leaves are fallen, but the sky is clear.
The rumor is a rendezvous draws near.




Something to think on …

All creative art is magic, is evocation of the unseen in forms persuasive, enlightening, familiar and surprising.
— Joseph Conrad, born on this date in 1857

Saturday, December 02, 2017

Takedown …

 Five Terrible Headlines From 'I F%@king Love Science' (From Just This Month) | RealClearScience.

Hobson’s choice by William Logan | The New Criterion

… Hobson’s choice by William Logan | The New Criterion. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)



On recent poetry by C. K. Williams, Michael Longley, Simon Armitage, Brenda Shaughnessy & Robert Pinsky.

The ways of Providence …

… Informal Inquiries : Today in History — Lydia Darragh spies on the British.

Art on the periphery …

… Zealotry of Guerin: On the Edge (Klee), Sonnet #381.

Something to think on …

The avant-garde are people who don't exactly know where they want to go, but are the first to get there.
— Romain Gary. who died on this date in 1980

Billions of dollars and much time spent to fight two thirds of a degree

The rate at which Earth’s atmosphere is warming has not significantly accelerated over the past 23 years, according to research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH)...Mathematically removing the natural but transient climatic effects of volcanoes and El Niño/La Niña Pacific Ocean warming and cooling events leaves an underlying climate trend, all or some part of which might be attributed to human causes — including enhanced greenhouse forcing caused by rising levels of CO2 and other manmade greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.  At present, however, there is no accepted tool or technique for confidently estimating how much of the warming in the past 38+ years might be due to natural causes...
The unadjusted climate trend in the deep troposphere from January 1979 to June 2017 was +0.155 C (about 0.279° F) per decade.  After adjusting for the volcanoes and other less significant effects, including the Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation and the Pacific decadal oscillation, the trend drops to 0.096 C per decade — or about 0.364 C (0.66° F) total since December 1978.

Friday, December 01, 2017

Unsystematic coherence …

… Christian Wiman's Collection 'Joy: 100 Poems' Is Luminous: Review - The Atlantic. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

FYI …

 Informal Inquiries : Blogging Note: history replaces literature.

Recommended …

 Informal Inquiries : The Secret Supper — a book review from 2006.

The subtle humanity of faith …

… Review: Can you see God and live? – Mark Vernon.

An invitation …

Would you be interested in participating in the event below?

What do you have to do? Bring books. Priced as low as you

reasonably can. Bring a refreshment or treat. Bring a holiday-

inspired poem to read (your own or by someone else).

All money from purchases goes to you, of course, and

there is no charge to participate.

Arrive at 6:30 PM. I hope you will be able to join us.

Let me know as soon as possible. And bring money to make

change at the event. Contact with interest: gontarek9@earthlink.net





GREEN LINE CAFÉ POETRY BOOK FAIR FOR THE HOLIDAYS


This Holiday Give The Gift

Of A Signed Copy Of A Book Of Poems


A Personal And Distinctive Gift Anyone Will Love


On Tuesday Evening, December 19, 2017, 7-8:30 PM,

The Green Line Poetry Series Will Present

A Small Fair Of Poetry Books (Specially Priced For The Event)

And Poets Happy To Inscribe Books For You


There Will Be Holiday Refreshments

And Short Holiday-Inspired Readings By The Poets


HOSTED BY
LEONARD GONTAREK  & POETRY IN COMMON


THE GREEN LINE CAFE IS LOCATED
AT 45TH & LOCUST STREETS,
Philadelphia, PA

Appreciation …

… Deck the Halls with Vince Guaraldi, the Musician Behind “A Charlie Brown Christmas” | The New Yorker. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Rescued …

… Snowy owl rescued from Alakef Coffee - KBJR 6 Your Weather Authority: News, Weather & Sports. (Hat tip, Emily Lull.)

December Reviews and Essays at North of Oxford …

… A Wilder Time by William E. Glassley.

… Ordinary Impalers by Anton Yakovlev.

… Single Woman by Dell Lemmon.

… The Lost Episodes of Beatie Scareli by Ginnetta Correli.

… Wind, Sand and Stars by Antoine de Saint Exupery.

… Exhortations By Tom Block.

Something to think on …

The most beautiful thing under the sun is being under the sun.
— Christa Wolf, who died in this date in 2011

Interesting …

… Thera Webb | Poem | Cosmonauts Avenue. (Hat tip, Gwendolyn Hendry.)

The possibility of revelation …

 First Known When Lost: Here.

I think that, toward the end of his life, Stevens harbored doubts about his project. I am not suggesting that he ever abandoned or repudiated it, or his belief in the human importance of the back-and-forth between Imagination and Reality. But one senses a bit of uncertainty, an awareness of other possibilities.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

The shape of things to come …

 Informal Inquiries : Mark Twain's birthday and my provocative prediction.

Actually, one of the better ways of making sure something stays a focus of attention is to ban it.

Worth considering …

… Ten Illuminating Books for Confusing Times | Readings | Zócalo Public Square. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

Hmm …

… God, God by Fleda Brown : American Life in Poetry. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)

RIP …

… Jerry Fodor (1935-2017) - Daily Nous. (Hat tip, Dave Lull.)

Worth pondering …

… A Prophetic and Violent Masterpiece | City Journal.

Burgess had been a schoolteacher (like William Golding, author of Lord of the Flies) and evidently sensed a stirring of revolt among the youth of his country and elsewhere in the West, a revolt with which—as a deeply unconventional man who felt himself to be an outsider however wealthy or famous he became, and who drank deep at the well of resentment as well as of spirituous liquors—he felt some sympathy and might even have helped in a small way to foment. And yet, as a man who was also deeply steeped in literary culture and tradition, he understood the importance of the shift of cultural authority from the old to the young and was very far from sanguine about its effects. He thought that the shift would lead to a hell on earth and the destruction of all that he valued.

Anniversary …

Much in what he says …

… Informal Inquiries : Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins.

Ah, yes …

… Broken Promises by David Kirby | Poetry Foundation. (Hat tip, Rus Bowden.)



Yesterday was David Kirby's birthday.